Capitol Hill

Agronomy

Nutrition

Oil and Seed Around the World

Latest Industry News

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Canola Quick Bytes

A supplement to U.S. Canola Digest


Capitol Hill

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) continues to make progress implementing the 2014 Farm Bill. On July 29, it released rules governing the Supplemental Coverage Option, a major new crop insurance provision included in the legislation. Progress on all aspects of farm bill implementation can be found on the USDA website.   

Southwestern canola producers in counties covered by the USDA's Risk Management Agency winter canola crop insurance have until Sept. 2 to purchase policies, according to the Southwest Farm Press. The Revenue Protection Plan or Yield Protection Plan are available. For growers in counties without a canola policy, they should apply for a written agreement through their crop insurance agent to ensure their ability to purchase crop insurance for their 2015 canola crop. The application takes up to 10 days to process once received by the agency, so growers are urged to apply as soon as possible.

Agronomy

The winter canola in Oklahoma, particularly near Burlington, is producing a lower yield than usual due to drought this year, according to The Prairie Star. Instead of the usual 1,500 pounds per acre, farmers have reported yields of 500-800 pounds per acre. Growers also experienced difficulty when the canola started flowering again after the crop was already swathed. Nonetheless, the article reports growers have benefited from canola by adopting no-till or minimum till farming for moisture conservation and to keep pests down.

The 10th annual Winter Canola Conference concluded July 30 in Enid and Altus, Okla., with sessions led by experts from Oklahoma State University (OSU), Kansas State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and industry. “The dry weather that the crop endured the entire growing season really presented some challenges, and then we had the mid-April freeze so this crop was produced under really difficult conditions,” said Josh Bushong, OSU Cooperative Extension canola specialist.


Nutrition

Drs. Mehmet Oz and Michael Roizen stood up to the suggestion that saturated fat is not as bad as it seems in The Buffalo News. Instead, they pointed to the wealth of evidence to the contrary. A Spanish study found a diet based on good fats, like the ones found in canola oil, can reduce heart attack and stroke risk by 30 percent, compared to a diet high in saturated fat.

If you are going to deep-fry food, why not make sure it’s done right? Bon Appetit provided essential fry tips on MSN Living, such as recommending chicken sit at room temperature for 30 minutes before beginning the fry process. Men’s Health discussed how to make the perfect onion rings, as well. Both sources suggest canola oil for frying due to its high smoke point and neutral flavor.

Coverage continued in The Globe and Mail and Chicago Tribune of a study published in the July issue of peer-reviewed journal Diabetes Care demonstrating the benefits of canola oil to people with diabetes. The research, led by Dr. David Jenkins of the University of Toronto and St. Michael’s Hospital, showed that a low glycemic-load diet including canola oil helps improve both cholesterol and blood sugar control.

Oil and Seed Around the World

Substantial rain in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada, has flooded many canola fields and storage bins, causing significant yield loss, according to Business News Network. The government forecast of 20.2 million acres of canola this year could be missed by up to 11 percent, indicated Errol Anderson, president of ProMarket Wire. “What we thought was going to be an abundant amount of canola one year from now just won’t be there,” he said. The fields in Alberta are in good to excellent condition, however.

In Edmonton, Albertaa new strain of clubroot has been discovered that renders all current clubroot-resistant canola varieties ineffective. An outbreak of blackleg has also occurred in Oregon’s Willamette Valley this spring. Growers in the Pacific Northwest are advised to only use certified seed that tests negative for blackleg.

Latest Industry News

In recognition of outstanding contributions to the industry, Gene Neuens of the Producers Cooperative Oil Mill in Oklahoma City was awarded the first Mark C. Boyles Oilseed Industry Meritorious Service Award by the Oklahoma Oilseed Commission. Neuens works throughout the region promoting winter canola and directed the first efforts of the industry a decade earlier. The award is named in memory of Mark C. Boyles of the Oklahoma State University Extension team, a vigorous promoter of winter canola and an industry leader, who died in 2013.

Canola may become more common in Southern Idaho rotations due to the opening of an oilseed crushing plant this fall in Plymouth, Utah, according to Capital Press. Washakie Renewable Energy is building the plant in hopes to cut costs by crushing its own oilseeds for its Plymouth biodiesel plant. About 400,000 acres of farmland will be needed to support the plant.

The Northeast Georgia Canola Production Meeting will be Aug. 18 at the Bowman Community Center, according to Growing Georgia. The event will be hosted by the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and Rubisco Seeds. Those currently growing or interested in growing winter canola are invited to attend. The event will cover agronomic production, insects and weed pests.

The 2015 Oilseed & Direct Seed Conference is scheduled for Jan. 20-22, 2015 at Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, Wash. Its theme is “Cropping Concepts: Feeding Farmer Innovations.” Information about the conference will be on the Washington State University’s Department of Crop & Soil Sciences website.


About USCA

Registration is now open for the Nov. 4-5, 2014 National Canola Research Conference (NCRC) in conjunction with the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America and Soil Science Society of America's annual meetings in Long Beach, Calif. Book your hotel room soon as spots quickly fill up. Attendees of the NCRC are encouraged to submit abstracts to present oral and/or poster presentations about specific topics, including canola end uses and agronomy.

 

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