Capitol Hill

Agronomy

Nutrition

Oil Production

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Canola Quick Bytes

A supplement to U.S. Canola Digest


Capitol Hill

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency approved on Jan. 31 two options for spring high-oleic (specialty type) canola insurance coverage for the 2013 crop year. Producers can elect to insure their specialty type canola at the premium price if separate yields are established for specialty canola and non-specialty canola. If producers elect not to insure using the premium price, the requirement for establishing separate yields will not be required. The insurance is available in the states of North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana. Provisions for specialty canola insurance are contained within 2013 Actuarial Information. Interested producers should contact a crop insurance agent for further information.
 
The Senate and House Agriculture Committees plan to mark-up the "2013" Farm Bill in late March or April after members have a better idea of the funds available to write the bill. This action would follow possible cuts resulting from either sequestration on March 1 or budget reconciliation. The initial Agriculture or “Farm Bill” 10-year baseline from the Congressional Budget Office is expected to be released in early February.

Agronomy

For a crop with a better return, Washington and Idaho farmers should look to canola, say growers who spoke at the Washington State University Oilseed Production and Marketing Conference Jan 21-22 in Kennewick. Washington farmer Curtis Hennings, addressing a crowd of about 225, said he made more money on canola than wheat for the past several years. He and other farmers also explained agronomic benefits they experienced from growing oilseeds like canola such as better soil quality and less erosion.

Compared with last year, Great Plains farmers are looking at their canola fields and seeing a vast difference: 2012 fields were full and green whereas this year’s are looking flat and dry. That’s according to agronomist Heath Sanders of Producers Cooperative Oil Mill, who recently surveyed fields across the state, during an interview on CanolaTV. Still, he added, the crop is not as bad off as it might look. “Never give up on it. I’ve been fooled many times by thinking nothing was going to make it and [yield] was pretty good for what it had been through,” he said. Winter hardiness has improved year-by-year as canola varieties have developed, but for now he advised patience with a wait and see approach.

The Manitoba Co-Operator reported that the 2013 seeded area of spring canola in Canada is expected to be at least 10-15 percent lower than the 21.5 million acres seeded in 2012. That’s likely due to the overextended rotation of canola in recent years and development of disease issues. Some analysts forecast the seeded area will decrease at least 1 million acres from a year ago, while others speculate it could drop as low as 1.5 million acres. Regardless, all analysts note that if more normal weather patterns in Canada return this spring and summer, and if average yields can be achieved, crop production on the lower seeded area could surpass that of 2012.

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Nutrition

Canola oil recently received generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status for use as an ingredient in term infant formula marketed in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently made public that it has no questions in response to a notice that was filed with the agency for the inclusion of canola oil as a source of fat in formula. Canola oil can be included at levels up to 31 percent of the total fat blend.

In an article for Health.com, Registered Dietitian Ellie Krieger, host of “Healthy Appetite” on The Cooking Channel, advised readers to “say bye to butter with canola oil.” She suggested replacing some of the butter in desserts with heart-healthy canola oil, which is rich in monounsaturated fat and has a neutral taste that lets the remaining butter flavor shine through.

Oil Production

Legumex Walker Inc. announced that the Pacific Coast Canola (PCC) oilseed processing facility in Warden, Wash., commenced production and completed its first sale and shipment of canola oil and meal last December. “We are thrilled to have the PCC facility in service producing super-degummed, expeller-pressed canola oil and canola meal so quickly and ahead of schedule,” said Joel Horn, president and CEO of Legumex Walker. PCC is 85 percent owned by Legumex Walker and 15 percent owned by Glencore Grain Investment LLC. According to Legumex Walker, demand for canola oil is expected to grow significantly over the long-term as food processors respond to consumer preferences for healthier oils and government crack-downs on trans fat. The growth of canola oil is expected to increase significantly in the U.S., where it comprises just 10 percent of the edible oil market compared to 70 percent in Canada. From 2005 to 2011, growth in U.S. canola oil consumption grew more than 80 percent.

Northstar Agri Industries expects the production of canola in the Enid, Okla., area to almost triple once a new $200 million processing plant is up and running in 2015. New details have emerged about the plant, which will employ 55 people, be able to process 28 million bushels of canola annually and yield 580 million pounds of food-grade oil. A consultant for the company stated that, “the plant will waste nothing, as the items that remain will be made into by-products like soap base and sold to other companies such as Land O’Lakes, which contracts for a large amount of canola.” Northstar expects to break ground on the plant in August or September, with construction estimated to take 16 to 18 months.

Lined Up Events

The 16th Annual Canola Day of the Northern Canola Growers Association will be Feb. 6 in Langdon, N.D. Attendees will hear the latest on oilseed markets and trends impacting the canola industry. Presenters will also discuss new canola crop insurance products, managing weed resistance and high-stability canola oils. Those wishing to attend the 2013 Ladies’ Canola Day Breakfast, sponsored by Bayer CropScience, can register via the hyperlink.  
 
The Canola Council of Canada’s 2013 Annual Convention will be in Vancouver, B.C. March 14-15. Topics will include nutrition, politics and industry news.  Register at canolacouncil.org.

The U.S. Canola Association 2013 Annual Membership and Board of Directors Meetings will be in Washington, D.C., March 18-20 at the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel near Capitol Hill. Register online today.

About People

Mark C. Boyles, M.S., passed away on Jan. 23 in Tulsa, Okla., at age 58. He was a canola project specialist in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. In 2004, he worked with Dr. Tom Peeper to start the Okanola Project to introduce winter-hardy canola as a profitable rotational crop for Oklahoma wheat growers. The U.S. Canola Association extends its deepest sympathies to his family and friends. Boyles is survived by his wife, Maria, son Brandon and daughter Katie. Memorial contributions may be made in Boyles’ name to the Ripley United Methodist Church at P.O. Box 354, Ripley, OK 74062 or the American Diabetes Association at 3000 United Founders Boulevard, #108, Oklahoma City, OK 73112.

 

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